Flow with the Seasons, Connect with the Divine, and Manifest Your Desires

7:00 PM on the New Moon
Friday 9/27          Monday 10/28
Tuesday 11/26     Wed 12/11  – Full Moon

Blossoming Path
10227 Fair Oaks Blvd, Fair Oaks Village
$10 Love Donation

Have you wanted a place where you could gather with other like-minded women?
Are you seeking the support and friendship of other women?
Are seeking a closer connection with Mother Earth and the Divine?

 

You are not Alone! There is a long history of women gathering in circle to sing and dance, share stories, offer support, and do ceremony together. In ancient times women were more connected to the earth, the cycles of the seasons, and the moon. Women were once seen as the living representatives of the Great Mother Goddess. In our fast-paced digital world of constant technological advancements, we have lost that connection leaving many feeling lost and disconnected.

Our New Moon Circle will offer you a special time to gather in ceremony with other women. We will reconnect with Mother Earth and the cycles of Her seasons while we release what no longer serves us, celebrate our accomplishments, and drum in our intentions for the next moon phase. It will be a time for connecting with other women, sharing our stories, offering support and encouragement as we develop a meaningful sisterhood. Bring your drums, rattles, tambourines, etc.

For more info contact Blossoming Path at 916-962-1469
Or Joy at 415-819-8769 or email joy@joyreichard.com

Presented by Rev. Joy Reichard, M.A. Joy is the founder of In Her Name Circles (San
Mateo), Unite with the Divine Feminine (Fair Oaks), Author of Celebrate the Divine
Feminine, and is a Transformative Life Coach, Hypnotherapist, and Reiki Master

 

 

 

Brigit, Celtic Goddess & Catholic Saint

Dec 2018 – Dec 2019 Schedule for Unite with the Divine Feminine Circles

Unite with the Divine Feminine and learn the wisdom that each Divine Feminine archetype has for contemporary women. She wants YOU to know that you are enough! Her myths and legends are teaching stories providing guidance on how to live with intention, strength, love, peace, compassion, and acceptance of diversity.

Third Wednesdays
6:30 to 8:30
Blossoming Path – 10227 Fair Oaks Blvd, Fair Oaks Village
Love Donation: $10.00

For more info contact Blossoming Path at 916-962-1469
or Joy at 415-819-8769

Join Our Meetup group at https://www.meetup.com/Unite-with-the-Divine-Feminine/

Unite with the Divine Feminine 2018

December 19th – Mother Mary – Nazarene Housewife or Queen of Heaven

Unite with the Divine Feminine 2019

Jan 16th – Isis, Hathor, and 5th Dimensional Consciousness

Feb. 20th – Brigit, the Celtic Triple Goddess, and Catholic Saint

Mar. 20th – Demeter and Persephone, a Myth of Death and Rebirth

Apr 17th – Sarasvati, Hindu Goddess of Wisdom and the Fine Arts

May 15 – Freya, the Empowered Earth Mother Goddess of the Norse

June 19th – Pele & Hi’iaka, Feminine Fire and Nurturing Tenderness

Jul 17th – Artemis, Goddess of the Hunt and the Amazons

Aug 21 – Sekhmet – The Egyptian Lion-headed Goddess of Transformation

Sep 18th – Yemaya – African Goddess of the Sea

Oct 16th – Hecate, Queen of the Witches or Wise Crone?

Nov 20th – Sorry – No Circle

Dec 18th – Our Lady of Guadalupe: Divine Mother of the People

Presented by Rev. Joy Reichard, M.A., Founder of In Her Name Circles (San Mateo),
Author of Celebrate the Divine Feminine, Life Coach, Hypnotherapist, and Reiki Master. Joy has a private practice in Fair Oaks, CA.

Last week I shared with you that I had discovered that my negative money story came from my parents who had acquired a scarcity mentality from growing up during the depression. Since then, I have come to realize that my fears and anxiety about money were the result of my own negative internal dialog that said things like: “you’re not good enough”, or “you can’t do it”, or “you’ll never get it right.” This was the source of the painful ebbs and flows I experienced with my finances and interfered with my manifesting skills. From my work with my clients, I know that many of you probably have the same inner voices, or ones that are unique to you and your family.

I’ve given names to some of my noisy inner voices. Last week I introduced you to Bargain Bettie, Anxious Annie, and Negative Nettie. Maybe you recognized them. Today I’m going to share with you three new voices that have obstructed the flow of money into my life. They are Meek Mellie, Frazzled Franny, and Worried Wilma. I will also share some tips as to how I learned to quiet these voices and cultivate more positive ones. If you have different “voices” you might try to identify them and come up with your own enlightened thoughts and remedies.

Meek Mellie
This is a really hard archetype for a lot of women because most women don’t acknowledge their own value. Generally women are raised to be compliant, helpful, and supportive. They are afraid to be ‘pushy’. Therefore it’s challenging for them to ‘ask for the business’, or to get their needs met, or even to defend their justified boundaries. In reality, these women are often not ‘pushy’ enough. My mother was a bright capable leader but always deferred to men because she thought they were inherently smarter, wiser and more competent; which is not always the case!

Enlightened thought: If you are seeking business, remember to present the benefits and the results your clients will get from the service or product you provide. Come from the authentic place of wanting to help improve someone’s life, business, or environment in some way – or to offer support or a service with voice of authority. You will find that your clients will respond. And remember that you have value, you are smart and competent, and you have a right to have your say and to defend your boundaries.

Remedy: Find a group that can help you overcome your insecurities about speaking up. Most communities have networking opportunities, leads groups and Toast Masters. Practice makes perfect! Know you will mess up – and that’s OK. There are lots of people wherever you are and most probably won’t remember you anyway. Practicing in front of a mirror is a good way to begin developing more confidence in speaking up.

Frazzled Franny
This archetype operates under the belief that “more is better”. She generally has lots of ideas, but no focus. She believes that hard work and struggle are the only ways to make money. Therefore she can become overwhelmed, or paralyzed, or tend to waste time chasing down unnecessary worm holes. Most of this is not her fault, but is the result of wearing too many hats. Most women survive by multitasking the various responsibilities of being mother, wife, and homemaker while also balancing a job, aging parents, their children’s activities, and trying to have some kind of a life of their own.

Enlightened Thought: Hopefully, Frazzled Frannie will learn that spreading herself too thin and/or taking on too many responsibilities is counterproductive. It leads to fatigue, irritability, loss of focus, and burn-out. This archetype needs to learn to simplify and focus on the priorities, one of which is her own self-care!

Remedy: Pick 2-5 main priorities for the year and stick to them. If something comes up that is not in one of those areas, then refer it out – don’t get scattered. By staying focused you can do what you do WELL!

Worried Wilma
This Archetype tends to lives in the future and is always catastrophizing; she is always worried about what will happen IF …

She is only trying to keep you safe by alerting you to potential dangers – but she ends up erecting so many roadblocks that it becomes almost impossible to move forward. This constant worrying and feeling stuck is a time and energy suck!

In reality, the archetypes from last week and this are trying to help in some way:

Bargain Betty – wants to save money.

Frazzled Franny – thinks that if you rush can maybe get everything done.

Meek Mellie, Anxious Annie, Negative Nettie, and Worried Wilma –  are just trying to keep you safe from embarrassing or dangerous situations.

They need to be forgiven because they are simply younger, more vulnerable, parts of you that haven’t realized that you have become so much bigger, wiser, more informed and competent than you felt when you created these inner personas earlier in your life.

Once you’ve identified the archetypes that are obstructing the flow of money and success and forgiven them, then you can focus on creating your positive archetype, the Money Diva, who allows you to succeed.

The Money Diva believes in herself and knows her worth.  She radiates confidence and knows the value of what she has to offer. Living with integrity, she is in service to the greater good and doesn’t sell herself or her services short.

Sanaya Roman, in her book Creating Money, says your beliefs create your reality. She goes on to say that beliefs are assumptions about the nature of reality because you create what you believe. You will always find proof for whatever it is you believe: I.e. If a person believes the universe is abundant, they will act as if the universe is abundant and they will attract abundance. If they believe money comes with hard work and struggle, making money will be hard. If they believe they can’t hold onto money, then money will appear to slip through their fingers. We will have whatever experience that proves what we believe.

Therefore, if we change what we believe, we can change what we experience. We can co-create our reality.

Most of my articles focus on women and the female perspective. This is sadly ignoring about 50% of the population. Men are also trying to find their way in our changing culture. I believe the changes are requiring men to develop more compassion. Yet, what is required of men to become more compassionate? For that answer I turned to an article written by Kozo Hattori that was published in the Greater Good.

As promised here is:

What Makes a Compassionate Man? Part Two

What does it take to foster compassion in men? To find out, Kozo Hattori interviewed scientific and spiritual experts.

3. Transcendence of gender stereotypes

All of the compassionate men interviewed broke out of the ‘act-like-a-man’ box. At a certain point in his life, Dr. Rick Hanson realized that he was too left brained, so he made a conscious effort to re-connect with his intuitive, emotional side. When Elad Levinson, program director for Spirit Rock Meditation Center, first encountered loving-kindness and compassion practices, his first reaction was what he claims to be fairly typical for men: “Come on! You are being a wuss, Levinson. No way are you going to sit here and wish yourself well.” So the actual practice of compassion instigated his breaking free from gender stereotypes.

Dr. Ted Zeff cites a study that found infant boys are more emotionally reactive than infant girls, but by the time a boy reaches five or six years old “he’s learned to repress every emotion except anger, because anger is the only emotion society tells a boy he is allowed to have.” If society restricts men’s emotional spectrum to anger, then it is obvious men need to transcend this conditioning to become compassionate.

Dr. Doty points to artificially defined roles as a major problem in our society because they prevent men from showing their vulnerability. “If you can’t be vulnerable, you can’t love,” says Doty. Vulnerability is a key to freedom from the act-like-a-man box, for it allows men to remove the armor of masculinity and authentically connect with others.

Both Dr. Doty and Scott Kriens emphasize authenticity as a necessary pathway to compassion. Kriens defines authenticity as “when someone is sharing what they believe as opposed to what they want you to believe.”  This opens the door to compassion and true connection with others.

4. Emotional intelligence

In Raising Cain, Dan Kindlon and Michael Thompson argue that most boys are raised to be emotionally ignorant: “Lacking an emotional education, a boy meets the pressure of adolescence and that singularly cruel peer culture with the only responses he has learned and practiced—and that he know are socially acceptable—the typical ‘manly’ responses of anger, aggression, and emotional withdrawal.”

In contrast, most of the men I interviewed were “emotionally literate.” They seemed to see and feel things with the sensitivity of a Geiger counter. Tears welled up in Dr. Doty’s eyes a number of times when he talked about compassion. Dr. Hanson explained how he landed in adulthood “from the neck up” then spent a large part of his 20s becoming whole again. Much of Chade-Meng Tan’s “Search Inside Yourself” training that he developed for the employees of Google is based on emotional intelligence developed through attention training, self-knowledge, and self-mastery.

Similarly, Father Richard Rohr leads initiation groups for young men that force initiates to face pain, loneliness, boredom, and suffering to expand their emotional and spiritual capacity. It is no coincidence that these initiations are held in nature. Nature seems to be an important liminal space that allows boys and men to reconnect with their inner world. Dr. Hanson is an avid mountain climber. Dr. Ted Zeff advocates spending time in nature with boys to allow their sensitivity to develop.

5. Silence

Almost all of the men I interviewed regularly spend some time in silence. They’d hit “pause” so that they can see themselves and others more clearly. When our interview approached two hours, Dr. Rick Hanson asked to wrap it up so he would have time for his morning meditation. Meng Tan had just returned from a week-long silent meditation retreat a few days before our interview. Scott Kriens started a daily sitting and journaling practice almost ten years ago that he rigorously practices to this day.

Father Richard Rohr practices Christian contemplative prayer, which he says leads to a state of “undefended knowing” that transcends dualistic, us/them thinking. Rohr argues that true compassion can’t happen without transcending dualistic thinking. “Silence teaches us not to rush to judgment,” says Rohr.

Self-awareness through mindfulness practices like meditation, silent prayer, or being in nature allow compassionate men to embrace suffering without reacting, resisting, or repressing. Thich Nhat Hanh says that mindfulness holds suffering tenderly “like a mother holding a baby.” That poetic image is backed up by more and more research, which is finding that mindfulness can help foster compassion for others.

So the path to making more compassionate men is clear: understand compassion as a strength, get to know yourself, transcend gender roles, look for positive role models—and become one yourself. If that sounds too complicated, 84-year-old Marvin Maurer sums up being a compassionate man in five easy words, “Be in love with love.”

You can find Part One of “What Makes a Compassionate Man” on my website. Click here. In the meantime, if you are a man who is struggling to find out how to be more compassionate in a patriarchal society, please contact Joy a call for a 30-minute complimentary consultation. Email Joy or call 415-819-8769 today.

 

You can find the original article at https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/what_makes_a_compassionate_man

Most of my articles focus on women and the female perspective. Sadly, this ignores about 50% of the population. Men are also trying to find their way in our changing culture. I believe these changes are requiring men to develop more compassion. Yet, what is required of men to become more compassionate? For that answer, I turned to an article written by Kozo Hattori that was published in the Great Good, ‘What Makes a Compassionate Man?’

What does it take to foster compassion in men? To find out, Kozo Hattori, the author, interviewed scientific and spiritual experts.

I remember being a very compassionate child. While watching The Little House on the Prairie, I cried my eyes out when Laura couldn’t give Pa a Christmas gift. But 12 years of physical abuse and being forced to the confines of the “act-like-a-man box” wrung most of that compassion out of me by the time I reached adulthood.

Although I was what therapists call “high functioning,” my lack of compassion was like a cancer that poisoned my friendships, relationships, business affairs, and life. At the age of 46, I hit rock bottom. Unemployed and on the verge of divorce, I found myself slapping my four-year-old son’s head when he wouldn’t listen to me. As the survivor of abuse, I had promised myself that I would never lay a hand on my children, but here I was abusing my beloved son.

I knew I had to change. I started with empathy, which led me to compassion. I committed to a daily meditation practice, took the CCARE Cultivating Compassion class at Stanford University, and completed a ten-day silent meditation retreat. I read and researched everything I could find on compassion. I found that the more compassion I felt, the happier I became.

Convinced that I had found an essential ingredient to a happy and peaceful life, I started to interview scientific and spiritual experts on compassion, trying to find out what made a compassionate man. Interviewees included Dr. Dacher Keltner, co-founder of the UC Berkeley Greater Good Science Center; Dr. James Doty, founder and director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education at Stanford University; Dr. Rick Hanson, author of Hardwiring Happiness; Marc Brackett, director of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence; and Thich Nhat Hanh, the Zen Buddhist Monk nominated by Martin Luther King Jr. for the Nobel Peace Prize in 1967.

From these interviews and research, I compiled a list of what makes a compassionate man.

1. A fundamental understanding of compassion
>Most events I attend that discuss compassion are predominantly attended by women. When I asked Thich Nhat Hanh how we could make compassion more attractive to men, he answered, “There must be a fundamental misunderstanding about the nature of compassion because compassion is very powerful…Compassion protects us more than guns, bombs, and money.” Although many men in society see compassion and sympathy as feminine—which translates to a weakness in our patriarchal society—all of the compassionate men I interviewed view compassion as a strength.

Dr. Hanson noted how compassion makes one more courageous since compassion strengthens the heart—courage comes from the French word “Coeur,” which means heart. Dacher Keltner argues that Darwin believed in “survival of the kindest,” not the fittest. Dr. Ted Zeff, author of Raise an Emotionally Healthy Boy, believes that only compassionate men can save the planet. Zeff argues that “the time has come to break the outdated, rigid male code that insists that all men should be aggressive, thick-skinned, and unemotional”—an excellent description of the act-like-a-man box that I tried to live in.

The compassionate men I interviewed agree with the Dalai Lama when he said, “Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them, humanity cannot survive.”

2. Compassionate role models
All of the compassionate men seemed to have role models that supported their compassion instinct. Marc Brackett gives credit to his uncle, Marvin Maurer, who was a social studies teacher trying to instill emotional intelligence in his student before the term emotional intelligence was coined. Over 30 years after teaching in middle school, Maurer’s “Feeling Words Curriculum” acts as a key component of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence RULER program. Similarly, Marshall Rosenberg, author of Nonviolent Communication, constantly mentions his compassionate uncle who cared for his dying grandmother.

A role model doesn’t necessarily have to be living, or even real. Chade-Meng Tan, author of Search Inside Yourself, cites Ben Kingsley’s portrayal of Gandhi as a role model for compassion. Dr. Rick Hanson posits Ender from the science fiction novel Ender’s Game as a compassionate role model. Certainly, Jesus and Buddha are obvious role models of compassion. The key is to treat them like role models.

Role models are not meant to be worshiped, deified, or prayed to. They are meant to be emulated. They pave the way for us to walk a similar path. Can we turn the other cheek and love our enemies like Jesus asked us? Can we transcend our ego and see all things as one, like the Buddha did?

In contrast are individuals who were not guided by positive role models. In his book From Wild Man to Wise Man, Franciscan Friar Richard Rohr describes what he calls “father hunger”: “Thousands and thousands of men, young and old…grew up without a good man’s love, without a father’s understanding and affirmation.” Rohr, who was a jail chaplain for 14 years, claims that “the only universal pattern I found with men and women in jail was that they did not have a good father.”

Scott Kriens, former CEO of Juniper Networks and founder/director of the 1440 Foundation, concurs: “The most powerful thing we can do for our children is be the example we can hope for.”

Stay tuned for Part Two of “What Makes a Compassionate Man” in next week’s ezine. In the meantime, if you are a man who is struggling to find out how to be more compassionate in a patriarchal society, please contact Joy a call for a 30-minute complimentary consultation. Email Joy or call 415-819-8769 today.

You can find the original article at https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/what_makes_a_compassionate_man

As a transformational coach I often hear about upsetting events and distressing circumstances in the lives of my clients.  Some of my friends wonder how I’m able to keep my distance emotionally when I hear these troubling stories. Through my own personal and spiritual journey, and my experience with 12-step programs, I was introduced to the concept which is called compassionate detachment.

Compassionate detachment is a mindset from which all of us can benefit when we exercise it in our relationships. It is a healthy way of relating to others which lets them know that you have a loving and caring concern for their predicament, while holding the belief that they have the inherent ability to deal with their own problems and become responsible for their own issues. Simultaneously you strive to maintain a sense of detachment about the outcome.

The important thing here is to stay detached so that you don’t step in and attempt to resolve their problem, their pain, or their issue for them.  This doesn’t mean, however, that you care any less for them. Nor does it mean that they, and the outcome, aren’t important to you.

Too often, many of us out of genuine concern will jump in and attempt to ‘rescue’ a friend. We might do this by giving advice, money, shelter, trying to ‘fix’ their feelings, or interceding for them in some way. Though our intentions may be good, in the long run we are doing our friend a disservice. By jumping in to rescue, we can end up disempowering the person we are trying to help. How? By not giving them the time, space, and self-confidence they need to develop their own ability to take care of themselves.

In addition, when we are in the rescue mode we tend to be working on our own agenda – on what we think might be best for our friend… which might not be what is best in the long run. Or we might like the feeling we get from being ‘needed.’ It might make us feel important. That is not necessarily helping our friend, however. In the end we could end up encouraging a dependency on our help rather than supporting their self-reliance and independence.

Rather than jumping to fix a problem, try listening compassionately without offering advice, or trying to fix the situation. Offer caring words of sympathy and be ‘present’ with them as they share what may be troubling them deeply. Many times a person just needs to be heard. Allowing someone to feel truly heard can be the greatest gift that you can give a friend.

So often my clients come to their own solutions just by having a safe space in which they can talk through an issue. In reality, we all have the answers within ourselves; we just need to be given the space, time, and belief in ourselves so that we can find them.


 

If you are struggling with some difficult challenges, give Joy a call for a 30-minute complimentary consultation to find out how she can help you. Call 415-819-8769 or email Joy today!

Most of us don’t like to make mistakes or to fail. Some of us hate failure so much that we don’t even try. We hold back because we don’t like the feelings that failure brings up.

In the past it was part of our karma to reflect, to feel bad, to regret our past mistakes and failures. This was so we could “hit bottom” and then have an epiphany that would inspire us to change. This is the reason monks and nuns had the knotted ropes so they could flagellate themselves and bring into their physical reality the pain of their failures, or the pain they thought they should feel.

In the past, our transformation into being a better person depended on owning our shadow traits, feeling bad about them, and making amends. This was a significant evolutionary insight for 5000 years ago. It served humanity well as we went through that period of advancement in consciousness.

Now we are moving into a new dimension of consciousness.

The time of repeatedly returning to the past for self-flagellation is DONE!!!

Now is a time to create — to bring forth a new era.

We each have our own special gifts. The world needs our gifts and talents. We are going through a challenging time in our global history. Environmentally, socially, politically our world has probably never been more challenged.

We can’t create if we keep cycling back into low vibrations where our thoughts sink into the abyss of our past mistakes, failures, embarrassments, etc.

They just suck us into feeling bad about ourselves.

When we succumb to the bad feelings that old painful memories bring up, our vibrations are lowered. We can’t ascend in consciousness, which is a higher vibrational state, if we are stuck in low vibrations. Make sense?

It’s time to deal with mistakes and failures in a new way.

Have compassion and forgiveness for yourself because you are on a very human journey. Only the tough and resilient choose to incarnate here on the earth-plane. Earth is considered a boot-camp for those souls who want to accelerate their ascension to higher consciousness.

Rather than flagellating yourself for mistakes and failures, or avoiding them altogether out of fear, start thanking the universe for each lesson you learn. Be compassionate and understanding of yourself and others. You, like everyone else, are doing the best you can on this journey to greater awareness. Staying in compassion, acceptance and love is how you raise your consciousness which will in turn help bring in the new era.

To help you do this I am providing a Daily Practice that will help you transform your failures into opportunities. I encourage you to commit to a 21-day practice. It will transform your life.

Daily Practice to Transform Failures into Opportunities

  1. Every morning, light a candle before your day starts and say: “I am a spark of the Divine. I light this candle to remind me that I become more enlightened from every challenge with which I am confronted. There are no problems or failures, only opportunities from which I can learn and grow.”
  2. Every night, light a candle and either write in your journal or say out loud three things that you are grateful for during your day.
  3. If you had a challenge, or if something didn’t work out as planned, then say or journal …
    • Today I experienced ________________. From this experience I learned _____________________.
    • Then affirm, “There are no problems or failures, only opportunities from which I can learn and grow.”
  4. Finally, feel compassion for yourself for this very human journey you are on. Give thanks for the opportunity to grow in awareness and understanding.
Do you feel the wildness within?… The energy of the wild woman that cries to be unleashed? Then you must also know that wild women need their sisters.There is a vastness to us. We are mystical – sometimes even mysterious. We are rich and vibrant and full of passion and purpose. In fact, we surge with it. It rises up in us — an all-consuming fire — and we burn with deep knowing, profound understanding, and a message to live in whatever way we see fit.If the wild woman is awakening, you know it! You feel the emerging fire.

Your divinity — your soul — is ready to be embodied. You are asked to become a living goddess, embracing the authority and immortality that comes with soul-full living.

We are fierce.
We have proven that we have what it takes to overcome great hardship. We have proven that our hearts can withstand our darkest days and still blaze the trail forward. We have conceived of the goddess within us. We are pregnant with the lights of our own being.

We are Sensual.
Being sensual is more than being sexual. The more you embrace your sensuality, the more you can embrace your sexuality. Being sensual means paying attention to and thoroughly enjoying what your senses are telling you.  It means fully experiencing the delight of beautiful smells, delicious tastes, interesting sounds, and the pleasures of touch.

When you pay attention to your senses you can more easily make that transition from working woman/mother/daughter/crone to sensual and sexual wild woman.

We are quickening.
Oh, can you feel it? Can you feel what is about to be born? The eclipses of this month have birthed us into the light. It is time to call our sisters to us. We must gather now. We must draw each other near. We all need midwives. We all need doulas.

We all need the songs of angels and the prayerful medicines of wise women in our midst. We are birthing a new world.

A sister circle is not a luxury. It is essential to our emotional and spiritual health.

Our culture pits women against each other because women of shared intent are dangerous to oppressive masculine systems. But we are wiser than that.

We know our own power, and when we create a circuit of energy with other loving and conscious women, we magnify the nurturing, the healing, the grace, the freedom, the creativity and the love our lives stand for.

Have you been yearning for a sister circle as much as I have?

If so, then I invite you to join one of the sister circles I’m offering. See the upcoming events below and make a commitment to join us. We welcome you in sisterhood.

In Her Name Circle (San Mateo, CA)

Hindu Shakta Tantra & Ancient Female Blood Mysteries
Featuring Kimberley Gibbons,

MA Women’s Spirituality, PhD student in Philosophy & Religion

 

Friday, August 25, 2017

7 to 9:00 PM

Unitarian Universalist of San Mateo, 300 E. Santa Inez, San Mateo, CA 94401

$15 online or $20 at the door

 

Circle with the Divine Feminine (Fair Oaks, CA)

Artemis: Patron Goddess of the Amazons

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

6:30 to 8:30 PM

 

Blossoming Path: 10227 Fair Oaks Blvd, Fair Oaks Village, CA

$10 Love Donation

Adapted from an article by Rebelle Society: Creatively Maladjusted http://www.rebellesociety.com/2015/01/28/a-sister-circle-is-not-a-luxury-7-guidelines-for-starting-your-own/

“All Things Are Connected,” the concluding chapter to John Robbins’ Pulitzer Prize nominated Diet for a New America (1987), begins with a quote from the famous mystic Edgar Cayce:

Destiny, or karma, depends upon what the soul has done about what it has become aware of.

John Robbins writes:

“At the present time, when most of us sit down to eat, we aren’t very aware of how our food choices affect the world.  We don’t realize that in every Big Mac there is a piece of the tropical rainforests, and with every billion burgers sold another hundred species become extinct.  We don’t realize that in the sizzle of our steaks there is the suffering of animals, the mining of our topsoil, the slashing of our forests, the harming of our economy, and the eroding of our health.  We don’t hear in the sizzle the cry of the hungry millions who might otherwise be fed.  We don’t see the toxic poisons (pesticides) accumulating in the food chains, poisoning our children and our earth for generations to come.

“But once we become aware of the impact of our food choices, we can never really forget.  Of course, we can push it all to the back of our minds, and we may need to do this, at times, to endure the enormity of what is involved.

“But the earth itself will remind us, as will our children, and the animals and the forests and the sky and the rivers, that we are part of this earth, and it is part of us.  All things are deeply connected, and so the choices we make in our daily lives have enormous influence, not only on our own health and vitality, but also on the lives of other beings, and indeed on the destiny of life on earth.

“Thankfully, we have cause to be grateful — what’s best for us personally is also best for other forms of life, and for the life support systems on which we all depend.

“The Indians who dwelt for countless centuries in what we now call the United States lived in harmony with the land and with nature.  Their societies were each unique, yet all were founded on a reverence for life that conserved nature rather than destroying it, and which lived in balance with what we today call the ecosystem.  To them, it was all the work of God.  Every shining pine needle, every sandy shore, every mist in the dark woods, every humming insect was holy.

“When the white man forced them to make the ultimate sacrifice and sell their land, the great Chief Seattle spoke for his people and asked one thing in return.  He did not ask something for himself, nor for his tribe, nor even for the Indian people.  There were, of course, many things of immense importance he must have wanted at such a time.  He could have asked for more blankets, horses, or food.  He could have asked that the ancestral burial grounds be respected.  He could have asked many things for himself or for his people.  But what stood above all else in importance had to do with the relationship between humans and other animals.  His one request was as prophetic as it was plain:

I will make one condition. The white man must treat the beasts of this land as his brothers. For whatever happens to the beasts soon happens to man. All things are connected.

“Chief Seattle spoke for a people whose bond with the natural world was unimaginably profound.  Yet the white man called them savages, and utterly disregarded his plea. The factory farms that produce today’s meats, dairy products and eggs are living testimony to how totally we have disdained the one condition he made.

“The white man thought Chief Seattle an ignorant savage.  But he was a prophet whose wisdom and eloquence arose from living contact with Creation.  And his words are astoundingly similar to those of a book written long, long ago.  The Bible, too, tells us the fates of humans and animals are intimately intertwined.

“For that which befalleth the sons of men befalleth the beasts.
Even one thing befalleth them:
as the one dieth, so dieth the other;
yea they have all one breath,
so that a man hath no pre-eminence above a beast.

—Ecclesiastes 3:19

“Chief Seattle did not know that centuries before a book called the Bible had spoken in words almost identical to his own.  But he spoke on behalf of life itself, and the wisdom of the ages poured through him.  Today, when we have strayed so very far from an ethical relationship to other creatures and to the welfare of the world we share, his message remains with us as a light of immeasurable brilliance.  Never before has the truth of his words been so apparent:

“One thing we know;
Our God is the same,
This earth is precious to Him…
This we know:
The earth does not belong to man:
Man belongs to the earth.
This we know:
All things are connected
Like the blood which unites one family.
All things are connected.
Whatever befalls the earth
Befalls the sons of the earth.
Man did not weave the web of life.
He is merely a strand in it.
Whatever he does to the web,
He does to himself.”

— http://www.all-creatures.org/murti/art-web-of-life.html

Disrespect for the earth and her cycles, ignorance and/or disregard of the dangers of polluting her land, atmosphere and waters that leads to environmental devastation ranks right up there with war. Both have a devastating effect on our planet, and thus humanity itself. There is a growing need to re-sanctify the web of life and the interconnectedness of all things. Sadly, many believe we are already running out of time.

If you are concerned about the fate of our Mother, the Earth, and live in the Sacramento Area, then join us for:

Grandmother Spider and Other Ancestral Native American Mother Archetypes
Presented by Circle with the Divine Feminine
Wednesday, August 16, 2017 
6:30 to 8:30 PM
Blossoming Paths, 10227 Fair Oaks Blvd, Fair Oaks Village, CA

For more info contact Blossoming Path at 916-962-1469 
Or Joy at 415-819-8769 or email joy@joyreichard.com

Grandmother Spider, or Spider Woman, appears in the origin stories of many Native American groups. She is just one of many ancestral Native American mother archetypes that you will be introduced to during this presentation. Legends and stories were important in Native American cultures because they helped Native American adapt and connect deeply to both the natural and supernatural worlds.

Please join us next Wednesday, Aug 16, to learn about Grandmother Spider and other Native American Mother Archetypes, to discover the importance of having a deeper rapport with the Great Mother, the Earth, and to experience a meditation that will strengthen your connection to the Web of Life.

John Robbins is considered by many to be one of the most eloquent and powerful spokespersons in the world for a sane, ethical and sustainable future. He has been a featured and keynote speaker at major conferences sponsored by Physicians for Social Responsibility, Beyond War, Oxfam, the Sierra Club, the Humane Society of the United States, the United Nations Environmental Program, UNICEF, and many other organizations dedicated to creating a healthy, just, and sustainable way of life. https://www.johnrobbins.info/

 

Last week I mentioned that at one time my attitude was so toxic that it literally polluted my life. Fortunately I had an epiphany that enabled me to realize that I was the source of my own misery. I was able to change my attitude and thus my life. I was still going through a difficult time, but my change in attitude helped me find solutions and improve my situation almost miraculously.If you are going through a tough time, remember that you always have a choice no matter what the circumstance may be. And the choice is this:You can either choose to let worry and upset fester at the expense of your life and well-being. Or, you can choose to see your situation in perspective, stay positive, and let go of anxiety and apprehension.

Sounds good, but how do you withstand those huge waves of negativity, let alone stay positive under the weight of an overwhelming challenge? Last week I gave 5 tips to help shift your attitude. You can read those HERE. Here are 5 more suggestions to consider:

6. Get enough sleep. During a stressful time, you might be tempted to skip on sleep, either voluntarily or not. But in reality, plenty of good quality sleep during a stressful time is even more important that the time you will gain by skimping. Adequate sleep will help you remain energetic, clear-headed and focused so that you’re able to figure out your next steps. When tired you’re more easily irritated and impatient, and you’re more likely to make mistakes or use poor judgment.

7. Limit bad news intake. Being constantly fed with gloomy news is enough to make even a dog panic for no reason. Today’s TV news is full of doom and gloom. Somedays it’s a virtual reality show of misadventures. Though it may seem entertaining, it can also be depressing and erode your positive attitude. Keep bad news, especially TV news, to a minimum as much as you can.

8. Join forces with others. When bad things happen, it is easy to become close-minded. But chances are, you are not alone during difficult times. There are likely to be many people who feel the same way as you do even though they may not voice this out loud. For instance, if you are worried about job security, recruit the help of your boss by discussing the implications of the crisis on your job and what you can best do to keep it. Your boss will appreciate your proactive approach and may even be glad that there is someone who shares the same sentiment. If you are unemployed, besides making trips to recruitment and government agencies to cast your employment net, connect with others who are in the same boat as you. Take this lull period to expand your network. The many talented friends that you will make during hard times could become lifetime friendships, and even turn into unexpected help in the future. And if you are an employer, this is a great time to boost your business with skillful and experienced people to help you ride out the crisis.

9. Get close to nature. Finnish researchers found that spending time in your favorite outdoor area and woodlands are more relaxing and restorative than time spent in your favorite urban settings or city parks. Taking a meditative walk through the woods is also a great way to clear the mind and regain mental balance.

10. Re-evaluate the meaning of your life. Tough times present hard but valuable lessons that can force us to re-evaluate the meanings we have been attaching to our lives. When facing adversity ask yourself:

• Are the meanings and goals I’ve been living by before this difficult time really worthwhile? 
• Through this challenge, what are the things that I’ve found to be really important? 
• And, what are those things that are not as important as what I once thought they were?

I’ve been through my share of difficult times. None of them were any fun! Yet, when I look back at those times I realize that they have been the source of some of my greatest insights and biggest lessons. I do believe it is possible to learn our lessons through ease and grace, but until that time, I find that maintaining a positive attitude helps me to find solutions more easily so I can more consistently live a joyful life.

I would like to leave you with these words from Viktor Frankl, the world-renowned psychiatrist who wrote Man’s Search for Meaning:

“Man is not free from conditions. But he is free to take a stand in regard to them. The conditions do not completely condition him. Within limits it is up to him whether or not he succumbs and surrenders to the conditions. He may as well rise above them and by so doing open up and enter the human dimension… Ultimately, man is not subject to the conditions that confront him; rather, these conditions are subject to his decision. Wittingly or unwittingly, he decides whether he will face up or give in, whether or not he will let himself be determined by the conditions.” 
— An excerpt from Psychotherapy and Existentialism

May your spirit grow stronger in the face of crisis!

If you are challenged with negative thinking, then contact Joy for a complimentary consultation to find out how your can reframe your thinking and live a more positive and happy life. Contact Joy at 415-819-8769 or email me today!